Papago woman

Ruth Underhill headed a college-financed anthropological study of the Southwestern-based Papago society Lavender. Underhill herself considers the possibility of several biases undermining the validity of the book as a historical resource when she admits this in her preface.

Papago woman

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The Autobiography of a Papago Woman - New York Essays

Underhill, is an ethnography of the life of a native american woman named Maria Chona, a member of the Southern Arizona Papago people located right outside of Tucson, Arizona on a reservation. Ruth lived among the Papago from till By hearing the life of this Papago woman she learned about life as Papago woman Papago.

To collect data about the Papago way of life and Chona, Ruth Underhill asked many questions. Underhill integrated her life into that of the tribe. In the 3 years she stayed there she learned much through this method.

She also used translators along the way. Ruth goes to Tuscon, Arizona on a grant from Colombia University, the college she was attending, to live amongst this native american tribe in the southwest.

Underhill drives to Arizona and meets a few friends living in Tuscon who tell her about the tribes people. They tell her how a few Papago come to their homes looking for work. They describe them as soft-spoken, brown people.

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Underhill inquired about any of the english speaking Papago she could meet. She is then introduced to a yardman, Rafeal, or Lapai in the language of his people.

Lapai in turn takes her to meet a woman named Chona who lives on a reservation in an unfurnished dwelling, similar to that of a cellar. Ruth listens with intent as Chona talks. Lapai translates the conversation for her. Throughout her stories, Ruth notices that Chona talks about how it used to be when she was a child.

Ruth asks Chona about her family. She learns that Chona had two sons and a daughter but one son who was a medicine man died, the other is in Mexico, and the daughter got married and moved away. They decided to go on a trip to visit Lillat and his family who lived far out on the reservation away from government headquarters.

Soon they set out but not before the rest of the people living around Chona tried to all hitch a ride with Ruth to see Lillat.

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On the way, Ruth learned much about the land as the Papago know it. Chona points to a white rock and tells Ruth about the kidnapping of the Papago woman by the Apache during the fall when the corn was ripe. They should not be told in the hot time when the snakes are out.

The snakes guard our secrets. In true Papago fashion, they waited to be welcomed. They all stood across from each other smiling. Lapai and Ruth were never introduced but instead were greeted with kind smiles of gratitude. She learned that the Papago do not believe in sayings superficial things such as thank you but instead being welcomed through hospitality.

Before dinner began, the ways of child-rearing were viewed. As dinner went on Ruth observed more and more of the Papago customs. Strangers were studied very carefully to see their true selves. Bedtime was early and the bed was on the ground. The day begin when men went to fill the water tanks.

The water was shared and not thrown out with the guest being the first to use it. Women set to work with the meals for the day and basket-making. Later that day, a girl named Vela who could speak a little bit of english visited. She promised to help Ruth with translations.

Ruth realized that her persistent questioning had been seen as ignorant and embarrassing to Chona. The women told Ruth about their job to bring the clouds to make rain.The story of Maria Chona, a Papago (Tohono O'odham) woman, is a sequence of intimate episodes and crises from her traditional and nontraditional life, including childbearing, marriages, family and reservation life, song making, and knowledge of practical regardbouddhiste.coms: 1.

Papago Woman - Kindle edition by Ruth M. Underhill. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Papago woman

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Papago Woman.5/5(1). The Autobiography of a Papago Woman In the latter part of the s, PhD.

Ruth Underhill headed a college-financed anthropological study of the Southwestern-based Papago society (Lavender). The result from the venture was a self-proclaimed “autobiography” of a Papago woman’s recount of her experiences as a member of .

Ruth Underhill was born in Ossining, New York on August 22, to Abram Sutton Underhill, a lawyer, She later wrote a book titled Autobiography of a Papago Woman, which chronicled the life of Maria Chona, an elderly member of the Tohono O’odham Nation. [full citation needed]. The Autobiography of a Papago Woman Description Chona, the daughter of a Papago (Tohono O’odham) village chief when the tribe first came under American supervision, was in her nineties when Underhill () recorded her recollections during several visits between and Papago Woman, written by Ruth M.

Underhill, is an ethnography of the life of a native american woman named Maria Chona, a member of the Southern Arizona Papago people located right outside of Tucson, Arizona on a reservation. Ruth lived among the Papago from till

Papago woman
Papago Woman by Ruth M. Underhill